Originally this page was going to be some sort of history of the disco scene in the UK, but as research went on, it began to become obvious that there wasn't really such a thing as a UK-wide disco scene until the very end of the 1970s. And so it changed direction. Thanks to Pete Haigh, Ian Levine, Neil Rushton, Graham Judson , Richard Searling, Ian Dewhirst, Dave McAleer, Kev Roberts, John Abbey, Retro Russ, Greg Wilson, Terry Farley, JJ, Steve Naylor and Mike Shaft, the piece eventually became about a scene in the north of England. So, Northern Disco it is...

This is by no means the whole story. If anyone has information they'd like to add, or know the whereabouts of people who are part of this story, please get in touch.

 

In the UK there's a long tradition of kids dancing to black music. As long ago as the 1940s the brits were dancing to jazz in venues completely under the radar as far as the rest of the population was aware, and for more than a decade it remained a well kept secret. In post war Britain, it wasn't the done thing to hang around in jazz clubs; the ballroom was still the place to go. But in the late 1950s the first proper youth cult began to emerge in London in the shape of modernists, or mods: kids who dressed sharp, taking influence from musicians and European film stars, but probably named after their love of modern jazz as much as their love of modern clothes. In the 1960s, when jazz spawned R&B, the mods found their own musical soundtrack and as imported records became more plentiful, and more and more uptempo R&B and soul music was being released, the mod scene expanded way beyond a few basements in the west end of London, spreading all over the countr; most famously to places like The Twisted Wheel in Manchester, where from 1963 Roger Eagle played to packed dancefloors at what were to become legendary all night soul sessions.

As the 1960s went on, black music continued to evolve: Motown moved to LA, resulting in a whole different sound for the label, James Brown was becoming a major influence, Curtis, Sly and Marvin were taking things deeper. But in the north of England, in certain clubs, and on certain drugs, that style of music didn't work. The dancers didn't want funkier or slower records and stuck steadfastly to the old records with the beat they craved. Inevitably, these old records eventually got played out, and the DJs had to dig deeper, looking for less obvious titles to play to their eager audiences, who couldn't get enough of this disappearing style of music. 1960s soul music remained massively popular throughout the decade in the north (and, it has to be said, through the next three decades), with King Mojo in Sheffield, The Catacombs in Wolverhampton, Va Va's in Bolton and of course The Torch in Stoke on Trent being just a few venues now famous the world over that were attracting large audiences of kids looking to hear the latest exclusive/elusive discoveries by the end of the 1960s.

All this was happening around the same time as the Stonewall riots in New York - widely regarded as the catalyst for the disco scene over there. That and of course DJs like Francis Grasso and Nicky Siano playing records in a whole new way... But the history of disco in New York has already been well documented. In the UK, however, things were different. There were no DJs over here breaking boundaries, no crazy custom sound systems, no gay rights riots. There was only the music. What was happening in parties and clubs in New York didn't have any influence over here, in the early 1970s at least. In London, things progressed as they had been already; when records with a "disco" sound appeared, they were simply added to the DJs' playlists, though disco was never a word used to describe the music for Londoners. In fact, disco as a style of music was frowned upon by a lot of DJs and clubbers alike. For many in the UK "disco" was a dirty word from the off. "The disco was what the wallies went to" as one London DJ puts it. So, while American clubbers took their tops off and embraced this new scene, in the UK, in the early days, they mocked it.

Except in one place...

The Highland Room in The Mecca Ballroom complex in Blackpool was the exception, and an extremely important club to the development of disco in the UK. Or more specifically, the DJ there, Ian Levine, was extremely important. Ian was a DJ who had a great ear and played from the heart. Initially a Motown lover, then northern soul freak and a record collector with an insatiable appetite; he was one of the first UK collectors to hit the States in search of rare records, and visited New York many times as the early disco scene was developing there. It was on a buying trip to Miami that he first heard the now legendary "It Really Hurts Me" by the Carstairs on a local radio station. Despite it being a complete departure from the northern soul records he was used to playing, he fell in love with it and started searching for a copy. It took a long time, but when he finally sourced one and played it at the Mecca, contrary to what has been written elsewhere, the dancefloor lapped it up. So much so that he went on to play it six times that night, with the reaction getting better each time. This wasn't the first 1970s release that made its way onto Ian's decks though - Pete Haigh, who was a regular dancer at the Mecca in the early 1970s, and went on to DJ there, names records like "TLC" by PJ and "My Man's a Sweet Man" by Millie jackson as new releases that were played alongside obscure 60s soul. Neither is the Carstairs a particularly "disco" record, but it was a completely different style of dance music to what had been played in northern clubs before then, and paved the way for tunes like "Where is The Love" by Betty Wright and "I'm Your Pimp" by the Skullsnaps, and solidified Ian's reputation as a DJ who was willing to take chances and break the mould when it came to soul music

 


Ian Levine can be credited as one of the first UK DJs to openly embrace the disco scene. He visited plenty of clubs in New York and befriended a lot of the DJs he met, which gave him access to all the new releases as they came off the press. Songs by Crown Heights Affair, Willy J, The Brothers and The Fatback Band became Mecca classics. Not only was Ian Levine the first UK DJ to play a 12" single; he was one of the first people in the world to even see one! It seems Kev Roberts (Wigan Casino DJ and northern soul collector extrordinaire - more about him later) was in RCA's New York office sometime in 1975 and was given a hot off the press 12" copy of Vicky Sue Robinson's "Never Gonna Let You Go", which he gave to Levine on his return to the UK. According to Ian, and he's argued his case over the years, this was the first promotional 12" single released. It was an experiment he says, and has the same two songs on both sides. Whether he's correct about this being the first 12" or not, it was most certainly the first one to reach UK shores, and Ian was definitely the first DJ to play it.

He became such a fan of the 12" format that he convinced Polydor Records to press what Ian believes is the UK's first 12" single - James Wells' "Baby I'm the Same Man", a record he wrote and produced and which was already big on northern dancefloors. It was pressed in a limited quantity for promotional use only, but Ian is convinced it was released before the likes of Ernie Bush "Breakaway", which was almost certainly the first commercially released 12" in the UK.

Unlike London's DJs and clubbers, Ian and his DJing partner Colin Curtis didn't shy away from the word disco - "New York Disco" and "Disco Funk" were used on much of the Mecca's promotional material. In fact, their adverts in Blues & Soul magazine from the time read "The Only Place To Hear Authentic New York Disco"! The time Ian spent over there hanging out with the likes of Jim Burgess, Warren Glock and Terry Sherman was rubbing off on him: although the equipment in the Mecca was very basic (Ian recalls only one turntable working at times, and him announcing the next song with a mic in one hand, while he tried to quickly change the record with the other), Ian developed an interest in mixing. By 1976 he'd taught himself, and managed to put his skills to the test with a couple of guest spots in Uncle Charlies in Miami, where his friend Steve Freeman was resident DJ. It would be a few years before he could utilise his new skill over here though.

 


The appearance of 12" singles in the states didn't go un-noticed by many in the industry over here. Though it would take almost a year before the UK started releasing commercially on this new format. John Abbey, who ran Blues and Soul Magazine, as well as Contempo Records, was quick off the mark, releasing what was probably the UK's first commercial 12" single (Ernie Bush - Breakaway), though he'd been releasing "disco" records on 45 for a while before then... records by Ultrafunk, The Armada Orchestra and so on, all released in 1975, and advertised under the slogan " The Pride Of The Discos". John is a true soul lover and spent a lot of time in New York. However he was more likely to be found in the Apollo than in a discotheque. He did have his finger on the pulse though, and with a shop on Hanway Street in London's west end, and with DJs being his biggest customers, he watched as 12" singles began to sell in quantity.



Another UK label who were quick off the mark to release disco records, and 12" singles was Pye. The man behind their disco output was Dave McAleer, who'd been involved in the northern soul scene for some time, previously running Pye Disco Demand, a label he set up in 1974 (much to the disgust of true soul fans it has to be said) to release back catalog material, aimed at the Wigan Casino crowd. Most of the releases were second rate non soul records with what Dave obviously saw as the right beat, or worse still, new releases tailor made for the Wigan dancefloor. He applied this latter strategy to some of his first 12" disco releases too, with Love Hustle by The Family Affair, which turned out to be a production by Tony Hatch, a UK composer best known for writing themes for UK television shows.. and not very credible ones at that: his most famous piece of work being the theme from Crossroads (a UK low budget afternoon soap). It's interesting to note that this was also released as a 12" a couple of years later, on Casino Classics, distributed by Pye, despite the Casino's anti disco stance. However, Pye also had distribution deals with a few US labels, including Right On (Disco Boogie Woman came out in the UK in 1975 on 7") and AVI (Tons of Rinder & Lewis stuff was released on 12" through Pye over here).

 



Whether they liked the term "disco" or not, all across the UK, DJs were picking up 12" singles and playing seven minute + records with percussion breakdowns for half the song. Tom Moulton was worshipped, but still, to the majority of Londoners at least, it was just uptempo soul music, and no different to the music they'd been dancing to the preceding years.

It seems most DJs who were a part of the "northern disco" scene were Blackpool Mecca regulars, and learned their trade from Ian Levine - Richard Searling was no exception, despite being a resident at The Mecca's biggest rival, Wigan Casino, from 1973 onwards. He's a busy man now, with a long and varied career under his belt, so it's hard to get much information from him about this era. However, when I asked him about UK disco clubs he was quick to mention Angels in Burnley where, between 1976 and 1978, he was Wednesday night resident DJ. For those who don't know, Burnley is a small Lancashire town, about 30 miles north of Manchester. A Wednesday night in Burnley isn't the most exotic of locations, but thanks to the vision of its manager Paul Simon, with possibly the first club in the UK to style itself loosely on a New York disco, a sound system to match and one of the country's top soul DJs as resident, Angels on a Wednesday night in Burnley was indeed the place to be!

 

The same year he got the Angels gig, Richard landed himself a job as RCA Records' North West Promotions Assistant, where he was responsible for such acts as Bonnie Tyler, Hall & Oates, Iggy Pop and David Bowie. One of the first things he did there was to set up Grapevine Records with John Anderson (together they became responsible for one of today's nicer UK only 12"s - Leo's Sunship "Give Me The Sunshine"). In 1977 Gregg Lynn, a great supporter of disco music and one of the first to see the potential of 12" singles over here, was poached by Richard from EMI Records. Richard worked closely with Greg who set up RCA's "Disco Direction" label, releasing material he licensed from the likes of TK Disco, as well as RCA's own disco releases. Most signifcantly to this piece though, in 1977 RCA UK picked up the rights to distribute Salsoul's catalog, which meant yet more 12" singles to be promoted by Richard; the first of course being Ten Percent by Double Exposure. To promote this landmark release, Richard threw a party at Manchester's Ritz...

Which leads us nicely onto Neil Rushton. Neil was another northern soul devotee who cut his teeth at the Mecca. Like his friend and mentor Ian Levine, he didn't limit his tastes to '60s stompers, developing a love of all types of soul music. By the mid 1970s there was a great split in the northern soul scene - instigated mainly, it would seem, by the Wigan Casino crowd, who were totally against anything that was released after 1965 being played on "the scene". (This is despite the fact that the records being played in Wigan were quite often sub-standard stompers by white artists, or instrumental surf music that happened to have the right beat). The hardcore northern crowd wanted to stay out all night, all weekend, with all nighters being the thing. On the other side, possibly as a reaction to this, there was an all dayer scene developing. In 1975 Neil Rushton launched what would become seminal events in Manchester's Ritz, running from 2pm-11pm Sunday, once a month, with a DJ lineup consisting of Neil, Ian Levine, Colin Curtis and Richard Searling. In the early days the musical menu consisted of mainly northern soul, but there were always new releases much like the Mecca material played. Gradually, the new releases became more and more popular, until by 1978, the playlist was 100% contemporary, with a strong emphasis on disco. The biggest crowd reaction Neil can remember was for Goody Goody "It Looks Like Love", a six minute long semi instrumental disco groover which was never released as a 45 - about as far removed from northern soul as a dance record can get! The Ritz quickly established itself as the biggest "Jazz funk" event outside of London, regularly attracting 1,700 people. Asked about the term jazz funk, as opposed to disco, Neil told me that "it sounded more underground than disco... proper disco was based on soul and gospel music. Normal clubs played commercial disco, we championed underground music". Despite the jazz funk tag, the HESC (Ritz promoters) didn't hide their affinity with disco - again, promotional material from the time describes the all dayer as a "Funky Disco Party" or an "All Day Boogie". While other soul events were giving away sew on patches, Neil's Heart of England Soul Club were giving away "12inch Disco Discs"!

 



As well as being a DJ, Neil was a record wholesaler and dealer, so had his finger very much on the pulse. A lot of his stock came from Tony Monson, who was one of the first people to import 12" singles to the UK. He says of the music in the north "London DJs were better treated by record companies when it came to being supplied with records, but the fanatical attitude and record hunting skills of people weaned on rare soul meant we were pretty good at finding records before they came out.. in Manchester Colin Curtis and John Grant were running a Sunday night club where a record a fortnight old was considered an oldie!".

His passion for music, and for record collecting led Neil to start the Inferno record label, releasing classic northern soul like "Tainted Love" by Gloria Jones, and "If That's What You Wanted" by Frankie Beverley on 7". In 1977 he pressed his first 12" single - Gil Scott Heron's "The Bottle", by now a Mecca standard and only ever available on 12" as a difficult to track down promo. Neil was keen to license The Carstairs "It Really Hurts Me" - by now a northern soul classic, and despite being told by many it would be impossible, he managed to track down the owners (it turned out to be De-Lite), signed the song, and asked if they had any alternative takes he could have. Turns out they did: no less than two unissued Tom Moulton mixes! Tom Moulton was a hero to anyone into this kind of music, so it was an exciting discovery. It made sense that this had to come out on 12", making it another quite desireable UK only rarity nowadays!

 



Then there was Kev Roberts - another Wigan Casino resident, and Blackpool Mecca regular. Around this time he was striking up a friendship with two young record producers he met while living for a spell in Brooklyn. Their names were Patrick Adams and Peter Brown. Like Neil Rushton, Kev was running a record label, reissuing classic northern soul on 7", but he'd recently been involved in the release of a cover of Silvetti's "Spring Rain" by the Destiny Orchestra (who, it turns out were none other than Shakatak, a band managed by Kev's friend Les McCutcheon, who went onto be quite successful in the 1980s). Kev's friendship with Peter inevitably led to some deals being done, and Kev issued some of Peter Brown's material on 12" on his Destiny label - Chain Reaction's "Dance Freak" and Eddie Cheba's "Looking Good", while Peter released "Green Onions" and "Spring Rain" both by the Destiny Orchestra on a US version of Destiny... Another P&P mystery solved then.

And yet another northern soul DJ who trod a similar path is Ian Dewhirst. Along with Richard Searling and Kev Roberts, he was a resident DJ at Wigan Casino from the start, having played all over the north of England since 1971. But his love of all types of soul music, and his hunger for rare records (at decent prices) led him to hit the states for six months in 1975, staying mainly in Los Angeles, but also taking in New York and San Francisco, visiting those cities' key clubs on the way. He couldn't fail to be influenced by what he experienced in those places.. he still gets goosebumps remembering the first time he heard "You + Me = Love" in Disco 9000: a penthouse club overlooking Sunset Strip, and seeing the place go mad. On his return to Britain he got more involved in the disco scene, playing the all dayers with Levine & co until in 1979 the Warehouse opened in Leeds. The Warehouse went a step further than Angels, installing a sound system and lighting rig that was comparable to anything New York had to offer, making it one of the country's first US style night clubs; the other being the Embassy in London. Clubs like Sundown, Samanthas and Studio Valbonne had opened their doors prior to this and certainly played disco music, but there was no disco scene in London comparable to what was going on in New York, with most clubbers still calling it soul music, or jazz funk. Both in the north and south most clubbers were still unaware of what was going on in clubs in the USA. The wiser people knew the records, knew Tom Moulton's name, or knew to look out for a Scepter 12" promo - but names like Mancuso, Rodriguez or Siano meant nothing.

 


Greg James was an American DJ, credited as the first to mix records over here. Greg was an audio engineer by trade, and a close friend of Richie Kaczor, who taught him his DJ skills. He was brought over for the opening of the Embassy, where he set up the sound system and became resident DJ. The Embassy quickly became London's answer to Studio 54: the place where the rich and glamorous hung out. London's clubbers who'd been dancing away happily to jazz funk in venues like the 100 Club and Crackers had no interest, and probably wouldn't get past the door anyway!

Greg schooled many of the UK's DJs including Ian Dewhirst, who was quick to learn and soon gained a reputation for his skills behind the decks at his Warehouse residency.. another club kitted out by Greg James.

Ian Levine was mixing around the same time too. It's most likely that he was in fact the first British mixing DJ; with the closure of the Mecca, he'd become Saturday resident at Angels in Burnley, where he stayed for a year between 1978 and 1979. This would make him the first British DJ to mix in clubs over here - second in the country behind Greg James, who was of course American.

Back in the south Froggy, part of the "Soul Mafia", and probably the closest thing to a disco DJ down there, had spent some time in New York, mingled with the DJs, experienced the sound systems, and brought a whole new style of DJing home with him to London. By now more and more DJs were changing their style, causing quite a bit of controversy in some quarters; so much so that Neil Rushton penned an article "Does The Talking Have To Stop" for his "Disco" Magazine (see below).

The rest is probably history....

 

For a more balanced view of the London club scene in the 1970s, look out for "Before Jack Had His Groove": written by Terry Farley and Roual Galloway, being published soon...

 

 

 

   

Growing controversy is developing over the introduction of American-style mixing techniques into Britain. Despite pressure from various fashion leaders in the UK industry many of the top jocks are firmly against what they see as "mixing-mania".

Greg Edwards, who hosts Capital Radio's highly influential Soul Spectrum programme claimed that any young jocks who slavishly follow the beats-per-minute/mixing trend will find doors to radio jobs shut firmly in their faces. He said "Jocks are just sitting down and spinning records and that's destroying the whole disc jockey profession. Nobody's going to get a job on radio just by linking records. A DJ will never learn his craft by listening to records and finding out which ones have exactly the same beat. An engineer is there for that job. A DJ is there to entertain people. The best DJs on radio were always those born and bred in the discos. Where else are they going to be trained"

>Robbie Vincent, who also presents Radio London's Saturday Soul programme and Radio 1's occasional Soul Show, is similarly set against the US-style. "American bad habits are not going to catch on here" he said. "People in the UK don't want to hear three solid hours of identical music."

The comments come at a time when mixing is beginning to make inroads into various quarters of the domestic disco scene. Clubs in the provinces are beginning to invest in expensive sound equipment.. Angels in Burnley, for instance, is readying a Sunday night New York Disco Session and beats-per-minute listings are becoming the rule rather than the exception in disco-orientated publications.

Record companies are jumping on the bandwagon too following the underground demand for the CBS Disco Pool Instant Replay set which featured American-style segues linking together hot dancers from CBS licensees like Prelude, TK and Philly International. Polydor launched their Steppin' Out campaign with an album featuring recent disco items mixed together and this week Motown release their first segue compilation - A Special Motown Disco Album.

Well-known personality Ian Levine, who has enjoyed more disco success in America than any other British producer firmly believes that mixing will take off in the UK. "The British disco scene is pathetic. The only true disco clubs are the gay clubs in London. Two or three years ago when disco was taking off in the States, Britain was on exactly the same level. But now all that's changed and a head-in-the-sand attitude towards exclusivity has developed and people have developed into jazz funk freaks."

"DJs in Britain get their reputation by spouting bullshit to wind the crowds up. In America the jocks don't do that, they get their following by mixing records in a skilful way. The American way is better because it utilises the music and interprets the music. In England the music is just part of what's going on. People talk about the All-Dayers being so popular that American disco music is irrelevant, but it's disco music which crosses over and has chart hits. A lot of All-Dayers feature boring jazz/funk instead of American disco music which is especially made to build up excitement."

"One of the reasons is that British DJs can't be bothered to understand what disco is really about. Unless you go to the states or a club like the Embassy it's very hard to appreciate just what it is all about. People say records are drossy but if they heard them in the right surroundings they wouldn't say that. Seeing a good DJ mix in the States is a revelation. It blows your brains. The only parallel I can make with the British scene is the kind of atmosphere and excitement that existed in northern soul venues around 1971 when it was worth talking about and before it went stagnant. Disco music in its purest form will get even bigger in the UK! I'm positive about that. And as the records are now made specifically to fit into programming for DJs who mix, then it's only logical that mixing will take off in Britain."

He bubbled with enthusiasm when asked to explain just what mixing is all about. "It's based on records with long intros, at least 24 bars with long breaks. The breaks can be emphasised by a DJ using a graphic equaliser and so you can join one record into another without the dancers realising what's going on. They'll be dancing away to one record and then in the middle of, say, a conga break they'll realise that without the beat changing or anything altering they are boogying away to another record. A jock will mix from a break in the middle of one record to a similar break in the middle of another or into the start of a record."

"I think a lot of DJs are resisting any suggestion towards mixing because they think it's boring. But the whole point of it is it's not boring, it's inventive. People talk about monotonous beat and robot DJs but that completely and absolutely missing the boat. Disco is complete and utter high-energy excitement. For a record to be suitable to mix it should vary between 126 and 138 beats-per-minute. And it's essential that the DJ should be able to vary the speed of the records he's playing. In fact, I'd go as far as to say that no self-respecting disco should be without variable speed decks. If clubs were prepared to spend money on equipment and the jocks over here would try mixing, it would wipe everything out."

CBS Disco-Pool manager Greg Lynn masterminded the Instant Replay album and says that as a promotional idea it was very useful. "It meant that three or four of our records were played in a row and, after all that's what promoting is all about" he pointed out. Various DJs on his mailing list have since contacted him with pro-mixing views. "They said they had never tried mixing before and that they had never been requested to do so - though why they should be requested before doing it is a moot point - but that following the popularity of our album with their audience they would try it." Nevertheless, Lynn does not believe that mixing will sweep the nation. "I don't think it will ever get to the situation where we will hear mixing in British clubs all the time. Over here the talking showman DJ is very important. The British gets off on talking to his audience not mixing records."

"Lets face it, you can have a British DJ who spoils things by the way they talk and equally you can have an American DJ who spoils things by the way he mixes. So it's not simply a question of one presentation method being good and another being not so good - whether you talk or mix, to succeed you've got to do it in a professional way."

Lynn also has doubts about audiences being ready to accept American disco even if their DJs want them to: "I think that if, by some miracle, all the clubs in the UK were overnight converted to their American counterparts with the best in lights, sounds and effects and so on, a lot of people would just not be able to take it in."

 

   

 

 

 

This is by no means a complete list. Far from it. Just some good examples of records played in northern clubs in the 1970s, along with the standard Salsoul etc that was played everywhere.....


AQUARIAN DREAM - PHOENIX
ASHFORD & SIMPSON - BOURGIE-BOURGIE
ATLANTA DISCO BAND - BAD LUCK
SANDY BARBER - STEPPING
BILEO - YOU CAN WIN
BILL BRANDON - THE STREETS GOT MY LADY
BOOGIEMAN ORCHESTRA - LADY LADY LADY
BRASS CONSTRUCTION - MOVIN'
CLOUD ONE - ATMOSPHERE STRUT
NORMAN CONNORS - ONCE I'VE BEEN THERE
CROWN HEIGHTS AFFAIR - DREAMING A DREAM
DON RENALDO STRINGS - FIDDLIN AROUND
ALFIE DAVIDSON - LOVE IS A SERIOUS BUSINESS
DON DOWNING - DREAM WORLD
FATBACK BAND - SPANISH HUSTLE
AL FOSTER BAND - NIGHT OF THE WOLF
FLAMING EMERALDS - HAVE SOME EVERYBODY
FOUR BELOW ZERO - MY BABY'S GOT E.S.P
GENTLEMAN & THEIR LADY - LIKE HER
GLASS FAMILY - SMOKE YOUR TROUBLES AWAY
GOODY GOODY - IT LOOKS LIKE LOVE
CARL GRAVES - HEART BE STILL
MILTON HAMILTON - LOVE SUPREME
BILL HARRIS - AM I COLD AM I HOT
RHANI HARRIS - SIX MILLION STEPS
GIL SCOTT HERON - THE BOTTLE
HOKIS POKIS - SWING
BLOOD HOLLINS - DON'T GIVE IT UP
EDDIE HOLMAN - NIGHT TO REMEMBER
HOSANNA - HIPIT
BOBBY HUTTON - LEND A HAND
INNER VISION - HONEY BABE
THE INVITATIONS - LOOK ON THE GOOD SIDE
WILLIE J & CO - BOOGIE WITH YOUR BABY
JA KKI - SUN SUN SUN
MILLIE JACKSON - A HOUSE FOR SALE

JOBEL - NEVER GONNA LET YOU GO
JUGGY MURRAY JONES - INSIDE AMERICA

 


ALFIE KHAN - LAW OF THE LAND
BO KIRKLAND AND RUTH DAVIS - YOU`RE GONNA GET NEXT TO ME
D.C. LARUE - CATHEDERALS
ELOISE LAWS - LOVE FACTORY
DAVID LENYARD - COULDA BEEN YOU
LOST FAMILY - BLOW MY MIND
PAT LUNDY - PARTY MUSIC
SKIP MAHONEY - RUNNING AWAY FROM LOVE
MARBOO - WHAT ABOUT LOVE
STEVE MARSHALL - MAINTAIN
FRANCINE McGEE - DELIRIUM
MISTURA - THE FLASHER
THE MOMENTS - I'VE GOT THE NEED
THE MOMENTS - NINE TIMES
BOBBY MOORE-TRY TO HOLD ON
NEW YORK PORT AUTHORITY - I GOT IT
NITE LITERS - KAY GEE
O JAYS - I LOVE MUSIC
PHILADELPHIA SOCIETY - 100 SOUTH OF BROADWAY
PHILLY DEVOTIONS - HURT SO BAD
LOUIE RAMIREZ - SALSA
RAMSAY & CO - LOVE CALL
RARE PLEASURE - LET ME DOWN EASY
DAVID RHODES - HUNG UP IN MID AIR
RIMSHOTS - DO WHAT YOU FEEL
LARRY SAUNDERS - ON THE REAL SIDE
SEVENTH WONDER - CAPTAIN OF MY SHIP
SILVER PLATINUM & GOLD - JUST FRIENDS
VESSIE SIMMONS - I CAN MAKE IT ON MY OWN
SISTER SLEDGE - LOVE DON'T YOU GO THROUGH NO CHANGES ON ME
STRINGFIELD FAMILY - SOUND OF DISCO ROCK
LEONE THOMAS - THANK YOU BABY
SIDNEY THOMAS - LOOK LET'S MAKE LOVE
BENNY TROY - I WANNA GIVE YOU TOMORROW
MIROSLAV VITOUS - NEW YORK CITY
ANTHONY WHITE - HEY BABY
C HENRY WOODS TROUPE - THE STRANGER